Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Zinnia Flower


by M. J. Joachim
It’s hard to believe the A – Z Challenge is finishing up today. I’ve had a grand time sharing so many flowers with all of you, many that I will use as guidelines for future projects, so please stay tuned. Your comments have energized me through this process. My brain is on overload with so many ideas for future projects, and I love getting your feedback on my work.
Zinnia is my z post – not my last flower. There were a few others I found while working on these that I’m excited to design and share with you. Unfortunately all this flower power has left my twelve months of doilies in the dust.
I’m still finalizing pattern details for February’s doily. March’s doily is complete with no tutorial page – handwritten page, yes, tutorial for site, no. April – well, it simply didn’t happen. To that end, I have decided to spend my summer making doilies. This likely means I won’t be posting every day. Doilies take time to do them right, and finalizing patterns takes even more time. It hit 100 degrees F here this past weekend, so while some of you are still buried in snow, summer has arrived for me – too hot to spend hours outside. Doily days are upon us…once my oldest daughter graduates from college next month, that is.
Onto our Zinnia Pattern now…Thank you all for an amazing A – Z Challenge this year!
You Will Need
Crochet thread and hook (I used 4-ply cotton yarn/size F hook
2 beads – 1 dark color, 1 lighter color
2 pieces pipe cleaner
Step 1:  (Foundation chain) Chain 17; single crochet in 2nd chain from hook
Step 2:  Chain 5; half double crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each chain; hdc in sc; sc in next chain on foundation chain

 



[Repeat Step 2 for each chain in foundation chain]
Note:  Petals will naturally create a spiral as you work.
Step 3:  Yarn over; insert hook from bottom of spiral through each layer of center; yarn over, pull loop back through bottom of flower and finish off. This will secure all layers of the flower together.


Step 4:  String 1 dark bead and 1 light bead on end of dark pipe cleaner & secure for flower center; fold bottom of pipe cleaner up and twist securely under beads; insert through top center of flower and all layers


Step 5:  Take green pipe cleaner and secure at base of flower, spiraling it down around dark pipe cleaner and loose ends of yarn to finish stem.

 



All patterns for A – Z Challenge 2013 are originals designed and created by me, so please abide by all copyright laws. However, you are more than welcome to link to my work. In fact, I would very much appreciate it if you do. Thank you!

 

Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.
Photo credit:  M. J. Joachim (©2013 All Rights Reserve); zinnia peruviana, Forest and Kim Starr, Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported; zinnia bi-color, Branlon, Public Domain
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Monday, April 29, 2013

Yucca Flower


by M. J. Joachim
Yucca is a desert plant and the flowers are positively gorgeous! My instructions for making the yucca plant are general. You can make yours any size, by using materials dependent upon your needs and desires. The yucca plant pictured is a small plant. I used 6 inch pieces of pipe cleaner for the flower strands. These worked well for the Cup of Leaves I made to go with this post.
I used a baby soft cream colored yarn and a size G hook. I also used branch colored pipe cleaner, because the color closely resembles the yucca plants in my own neighborhood.
Begin by Making 1 Cup of Leaves
Step 1:  Chain 4; make a popcorn stitch
>>>Double crochet 3 times in 4th chain from hook
>>>Remove hook from loop
>>>Insert hook in last chain of 1st chain 4 and back through loop removed
>>>Yarn over, draw through both loops on hook


 [Repeat Step 1, to make a long row of solitary popcorn stitches.]
These can vary in length, ranging between 6 – 10 popcorn stitches.
Weave in loose ends.
Step 2:  Weave a piece of pipe cleaner through popcorn stitches – leave a bit of pipe cleaner at each end.


Make several strands of popcorn stitches with pipe cleaner – 5 to 8 works well for each plant.


Step 3:  Bunch up bottom of pipe cleaner and twist it together. Repeat for top of pipe cleaner, strategically placing petals as you work.


Step 4:  Insert bottom of pipe cleaner thorough center of cup of leaves; untwist and lay flat, wrapping loose ends of pipe cleaner up around base of plant.


All patterns for A – Z Challenge 2013 are originals designed and created by me, so please abide by all copyright laws. However, you are more than welcome to link to my work. In fact, I would very much appreciate it if you do. Thank you!


Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.
Photo credit:  M. J. Joachim (©2013 All Rights Reserved); Yucca filamentosa, Moriori, Public Domain
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Xanthisma Flower


by M. J. Joachim
I have to say, X is one of my favorite flowers for this challenge. Funny that last year’s X post is also a favorite of mine. This little flower is so bright and cheerful, plus it’s one of the easiest patterns I’ve made. Of course by the time I got to X, I was getting pretty good at designing flowers. But still, this little flower makes me smile and I want to make whole vases full of them, to brighten up dull spaces in my home and bring a little sunshine to inconspicuous corners.



I used yellow embroidery floss, green pipe cleaner and a two-holed yellow button to make my flower.
Step 1:  Chain 2, make 6 single crochet in 2nd chain from hook
Step 2:  Single crochet in same place and in each single crochet around; join with slip stitch to 1st single crochet
Step 3:  Chain 4, single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each chain back to single crochet; slip stitch in sc in center.
[Repeat Step 3 once in same place and twice in each single crochet around, joining with slip stitch to 1st stitch in round]
Finish off.

 


Step 4:  Insert pipe cleaner from bottom through top of flower. Weave pipe cleaner through a yellow two-holed button and back through base of flower, pulling it securely into place.
Step 5:  Use short end of pipe cleaner to wrap around loose threads; trim loose ends and pull tips of flower petals out to separate them. Steam and starch if desired
All patterns for A – Z Challenge 2013 are originals designed and created by me, so please abide by all copyright laws. However, you are more than welcome to link to my work. In fact, I would very much appreciate it if you do. Thank you!

 



Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.
Photo credit:  M. J. Joachim (©2013 All Rights Reserved); xanthisma spinulosum, Stan Shebs, GFDL (both photos)
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Friday, April 26, 2013

Windflower


by M. J. Joachim
When it came to preparing my W post, I couldn’t help but start humming a song from way back when, Windflowers. Once that happened there was no stopping me, as I curiously started looking for pictures to see if I could design and make one. Turns out, they’re not that difficult to make at all. I used 4-ply cotton white yarn, a small yellow bead and yellow embroidery floss for the center and green pipe cleaner for the stem.
Step 1:  (Foundation chain) Chain 7
Step 2:  Single crochet in 2nd chain from hook; chain 7
Step 3:  Half double crochet in 2nd chain from hook, double crochet in next chain
Step 4:  Make 1 triple in each of the next 3 chain; double crochet in next chain and half double crochet in single crochet
Step 5:  Single crochet in next chain of foundation chain; chain 7
[Repeat Steps 3 – 5 for each chain on foundation chain; Repeat Steps 3 & 4 one more time to make last petal, so you have 6 petals.]

 

Step 6:  Skip 3 petals and slip stitch into sc of 4th petal, so that petals overlap; make 1 more slip stitch into 1st petal underneath to secure; fasten off


Step 7:  Take a piece of 6-strand (yellow) embroidery thread and thread 1 end through bead, knotting securely at top, leaving a long tail for stamen
Step 8:  Use crochet hook to draw bottom tail of yellow thread through base of flower, centering bead in top of flower


Step 9:  Take 1 green piece of pipe cleaner; poke through bottom of flower and secure directly under bead


Step 10:  Wrap 2nd piece of green pipe cleaner around loose yarn and thread, as you wrap it around 1st piece of pipe cleaner
Step 11:  Trim top of thread and fluff out ends in center of flower
All patterns for A – Z Challenge 2013 are originals designed and created by me, so please abide by all copyright laws. However, you are more than welcome to link to my work. In fact, I would very much appreciate it if you do. Thank you!


Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.


Photo credit:  M. J. Joachim (©2013 All Rights Reserved); Windflower, Abelsson, GFDL
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Vinca Flower


by M. J. Joachim
More than ten years ago, when we were living in another house, another city, we had vincas displaying beautifully in our front yard. They were pretty pastel purples and pinks, delicate salmons and various shades of creams and white. Their blooms never seem to fade, regardless of the extreme heat in summer. They were drought hearty and thrived in almost any weather condition.

You Will Need
Crochet yarn and hook – I used 4-ply cotton yarn and a size D hook
Yarn needle + yarn for sewing
Stem colored pipe cleaner
Button or bead – I used a little round yellow button
Petals – Make 5


Foundation:  Chain 8; single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each chain across
Step 1:  Chain 2, sc in each stitch across row
Step 2:  Turn, sc in 1st stitch and in each stitch across row
Step 3:  Chain 1, turn; make 1 sc in turning chain; make 1 sc in each stitch across row, except the very last stitch; slip stitch in the last stitch of the row
Step 4:  Turn; slip stitch in 2nd stitch from hook; single crochet in each of next 5 stitches, make 2 sc in next stitch
Step 5:  Turn; slip stitch in next stitch; sc in next 6 stitches
Step 6:  Turn; slip stitch in next stitch; sc in next 5 stitches
Step 7:  Turn; slip stitch in 1st stitch; sc in next 4 stitches; slip stitch in last stitch
Step 8:  Turn; slip stitch in 1st stitch; sc in next 3 stitches; slip stitch in last 2 stitches
Step 9:  Turn; slip stitch in next stitch; sc in next 2 stitches; slip stitch in last stitch
Step 10:  Turn; slip stitch in 1st stitch; sc in next 2 stitches; slip stitch in last stitch
Step 11:  Turn; slip stitch in 1st stitch, sc in next stitch; slip stitch in next stitch
Step 12:  Turn; slip stitch in next 2 stitches; finish off
Part 2
Take yarn needle with sewing yarn and sew center of flower together with a straight stitch, working your way over and under around the center of the flower (2 times) to secure petals together. Finish off. Weave in loose ends.


Next, using threaded yarn needle, start half way up 1st petal and whip stitch to center; then work your way up next petal in same way, securing loose ends behind stitches as you work.


[Repeat for all petals.]
Do not finish off last petal. Instead, continue and sew round button or bead to flower center.


Wind piece of stem colored pipe cleaner around your finger to make stem. Attach to back center of flower.
Note:  Vinca flower stitches are very tight. Steam petals if desired to relax them.
All patterns for A – Z Challenge 2013 are originals designed and created by me, so please abide by all copyright laws. However, you are more than welcome to link to my work. In fact, I would very much appreciate it if you do. Thank you!


Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.
Photo credit:  M. J. Joachim (©2013 All Rights Reserved); Vinca, Kelly Martin, GFDL
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Uva-ursi Flower


by M. J. Joachim
Uva-ursi is best known for its berries. Consequently, not many flower blooms see the light of day. It is a flower shrub, with pinkish-red berries that are used for homeopathic and medicinal purposes. As a shrub, its stems are short. You can use floral foam to make a beautiful uva-ursi plant. Simply cover the floral foam in decorative leaves like this broad leaf crochet pattern and add pretty uva-ursi flowers to accent your new crocheted plant.
Instructions to make 1 Uva-ursi flower
Step 1:  Make 1 white Star Crochet 120512 pattern
Step 2:  Twist together 1 green and 1 white 12 inch piece of pipe cleaner

 

Step 3:  Insert pipe cleaner through bottom of flower; place light pink bead or shell fragment over white end of pipe cleaner, securing by folding it over the bead
Step 4:  Fold pipe cleaner up to make shorter stem, twisting it together and leaving a few inches of a tail


Step 5:  Take (excess) tail end of pipe cleaner and wrap around base of flower petals securely; open petals to show bloom.
All patterns for A – Z Challenge 2013 are originals designed and created by me, so please abide by all copyright laws. However, you are more than welcome to link to my work. In fact, I would very much appreciate it if you do. Thank you!


Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.
Photo credit:  M. J. Joachim (©2013 All Rights Reserved); Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), Cliff, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Tulip Crocheted Flower


by M. J. Joachim
Tulips are one of my favorite flowers. I only wish their bloom lasted a little longer here. Still, I keep a few in my yard for pleasure, along with hyacinth, daffodils and hollyhocks. I used a light-weight baby yarn for my tulip pattern and a small hook. The yarn reminded me of a few of my blooms this year. I’ll be making more tulips, experimenting with materials to vary the result. As no two blooms are exactly alike, I’m sure it will be a fun and worthy activity.
You Will Need
Doily thread or yarn and appropriate crochet hook
1 dark bead or button
5 twelve inch pieces of (petal color) pipe cleaner and yellow pipe cleaner
Small beads for flower center (optional)
Floral tape
Step 1:  Chain 4; join with slip stitch to 1st chain to make a ring
Step 2:  Chain 1, make 10 single crochet in center of ring
Step 3:  Chain 3 (counts as 1st dc), make {1 dc, 1 tr, 2 dc} in same place
Step 4:  Single crochet in next sc; slip stitch in following sc
[Repeat Steps 3 and 4 around, ending by joining with a slip stitch to 1st sc in round]


Step 5:  Chain 3, single crochet in next triple; chain 3, slip stitch in next sc
[Repeat Step 5 around]
Step 6:  Slip stitch into next chain 3 space; chain 3 (counts as dc), make 2 more double crochet in same space
Step 7:  Make 3 triple in next sc at top of previous sc; make 3 dc in next chain 3 space
[Repeat Steps 6 & 7 for each petal around, joining with slip stitch at end of round]


Step 8:  Slip stitch into next chain 3 space; make 1 triple in each stitch of petal except the last stitch – make 1 double crochet in the last stitch
Step 9:  Chain 3 and slip stitch in same stitch as dc
[Repeat Steps 8 & 9 around, joining with a slip stitch to 1st stitch in round]

 
 

Finish off. Weave in loose ends.
Step 10:  Take 5 matching pieces of 12 inch pipe cleaner, one for each petal, and insert from bottom center of flower, about half way; weave pipe cleaner around each petal to shape its edge, allowing you to fold petals up into a cup shape, and ending with pipe cleaner at bottom center of flower.

 

Note:  This is by no means an exact science. If you find it easier to use one piece of pipe cleaner at a time, do it. Also, how you weave pipe cleaner through each petal can vary, which will make your petals unique and different too, just as they are in the garden.
Step 11:  Mold and shape petals
Step 12:  Take a dark button or bead and one 12 inch piece of yellow pipe cleaner; insert it through button or bead, leaving a small loop; take 3 short pieces of pipe cleaner and twist at top of button to make stamen

 

 

Step 13:  Insert yellow pipe cleaner through top center of flower and pull down. Trim stamen as desired and fluff it out

 
 

Step 14:  Tightly wrap floral tape around all pipe cleaner strands to make stem


Step 15:  Add beads to top of stamen ends if desired
All patterns for A – Z Challenge 2013 are originals designed and created by me, so please abide by all copyright laws. However, you are more than welcome to link to my work. In fact, I would very much appreciate it if you do. Thank you!


Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.
Photo credit:  M. J. Joachim (©2013 All Rights Reserved); Tulip floriade Canberra, John O’Neill (Picture of the Day August 11, 2006), GFDL
©2013 All Rights Reserved