Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Rounded Corner Square 022713


by M. J. Joachim
This is a simple pattern that I think could be used in numerous projects including clothing, lace and as an embellishment. It’s my own design. Feel free to link to it, but please respect all rules of copyright.
Step 1:  Chain 4; single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each chain across
Step 2:  Chain 1, turn; single crochet in each stitch across
[Repeat Step 2 one more time]
Step 3:  Chain 1, turn; make 2 sc in 1st stitch; make 1 sc in next stitch and 3 sc in last stitch
Step 4:  (Right side up) Make a clockwise turn and make 1 sc in 2nd stitch; make 3 sc in corner


[Repeat Step 4 one more time; sc in center row, make 1 sc in last corner and join with a slip stitch to 1st sc in round.]


Step 5:  Chain 3 (counts as 1st dc), make 4 more dc in same place
Step 6:  Single crochet in 2nd sc from hook; make 5 double crochet in center sc in corner.
[Repeat Step 6 around, joining with a slip stitch to top chain of 1st dc.]
Finish off.
That’s all for now,
Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches,
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Pentagon Motif Pattern 022613 (two-color)


Today’s pentagon motif pattern is a variation from yesterday’s post. It is smaller, as there are fewer rounds. It’s my own design. Feel free to link to it, but please respect all rules of copyright. Again, I’m curious as to how you might use this new motif. Thank you for sharing your ideas in the comments.
Using Color A
Step 1:  Chain 4; join with slip stitch to 1st chain to form a ring
Step 2:  Chain 5 (counts as 1st double crochet + chain 2); double crochet in center of ring
Step 3:  {Double crochet + chain 2 + double crochet} in center of ring (4 times); join with slip stitch to 3rd chain of first chain 5
Finish off. Join Color B to any chain 2 space.
Step 4:  Chain 3 (counts as 1st dc); make 2 more double crochet in same place
Step 5:  Chain 3, make 3 dc in next chain 2 space
[Repeat Step 5 around, ending with chain 3 and joining with slip stitch to top chain of 1st dc]
Finish off. Join Color A to 2nd double crochet in any group of 3 double crochet stitches.
Step 6:  Chain 3 (counts as 1st dc); {double crochet + chain 1 + 2 dc} in same stitch
Step 7:  Make 3 single crochet in next chain 3 space; make {2 dc + chain 1 + 2 dc} in 2nd dc from hook (center dc of next group of 3 dcs)
[Repeat Step 7 around, ending with 3 sc in last chain 3 space and joining with slip stitch to top chain of 1st dc]
Finish off. Weave in loose ends.
Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Monday, February 25, 2013

Pentagon Motif Pattern 022513


by M. J. Joachim
In the interest of providing a variety of crochet shape motifs on Lots of Crochet Stitches, I created an easy pentagon for you today. It’s my own design. Feel free to link to it, but please respect all rules of copyright.
I’m sure there are lots of things you can make with this motif pattern. I have to ask though, how would you use this new motif and what would you make with it? Please share your answers in the comments. Thank you!
Step 1:  Chain 4; join with slip stitch to 1st chain to form a ring
Step 2:  Chain 5 (counts as 1st double crochet + chain 2); double crochet in center of ring
Step 3:  {Double crochet + chain 2 + double crochet} in center of ring (4 times); join with slip stitch to 3rd chain of first chain 5


Step 4:  Slip stitch into chain 2 space; chain 3 (counts as 1st dc); make 2 more double crochet in same place
Step 5:  Chain 3, make 3 dc in next chain 2 space
[Repeat Step 5 around, ending with chain 3 and joining with slip stitch to top chain of 1st dc]


Step 6:  Slip stitch into next double crochet; chain 3 (counts as 1st dc); {double crochet + chain 1 + 2 dc} in same stitch
Step 7:  Make 3 single crochet in next chain 3 space; make {2 dc + chain 1 + 2 dc} in 2nd dc from hook (center dc of next group of 3 dcs)
[Repeat Step 7 around, ending with 3 sc in last chain 3 space and joining with slip stitch to top chain of 1st dc]


Step 8:  Slip stitch in next dc and into next chain 1 space; chain 3 (counts as 1st dc); make 2 dc + chain 2 + 3 dc in same place
Step 9:  Double crochet in each of next 3 single crochet stitches; make {3 dc + chain 2 + 3 dc} in next chain 1 space
[Repeat Step 9 around, ending with 1 double crochet stitch in each of last 3 single crochets, and joining with slip stitch to top chain of 1st dc]
I truly hope you enjoy making this new 5-sided motif.
Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Friday, February 22, 2013

Reading Crochet Patterns


by M. J. Joachim
Today I spent some time trying to make one of those patterns I found on another website. I was planning to make it, take a picture and share the link to their page on our blog today.
Now I’m no novice when it comes to following patterns, but this one – though it seems simple enough, is driving me crazy. To top it off, the site is in another language, so I’m following a diagram, as opposed to a row by row (step by step) process.
Suffice to say, it’s not happening, and I’m not sure it ever will. When I have that much difficulty trying to decipher a pattern, moving on is the only alternative. At some point, I will likely write my own pattern for something very similar and share it with you.
This experience has me curious. What is your preference for following crochet patterns? How do you feel about reading diagrams?  I learned to read instructions first, but find diagrams very helpful when I get confused about anything. Do you prefer one over the other, or do you use both, like I do?
Best of Friday and the weekend to you!
Until next time, happy crocheting!
M. J.
Photo credit:  Crochet Solid Shell Stitch, WillowW, GNU Free Documentation License
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Sore Crochet Hands – Gotcha Covered!


by M. J. Joachim
When you love to crochet as much as I do, it becomes inevitable. Sooner or later your hands are going to get sore, and you might even develop a few callouses on your fingers. Like with anything else, you need to take care of yourself, or you’ll never want to pick up that hook again.
One of my favorite remedies for the dreaded sore hands is green drinks. Seriously folks, these things work! I’m not talking about sugary, over-rated fancy drinks they sell in the grocery store. I’m talking about nutritious vegetable + fruit drinks, made to give your bloodstream a boost and kick those healing mechanisms into high gear!
Dark green leafys with a clove of garlic and some fresh fruit can’t be beat – speaking of which, beet tops are amazing! I grow a lot of my own green leafys personally. When my body screams with aches and pains – whatever the cause…could be I slept wrong and my back is killing me, or maybe I spent too much time pulling weeds in the garden. It doesn’t matter what it is, these drinks make me feel better in record time. As for crochet pain – my right thumb has been killing me lately. Started drinking my green drinks again – the swelling went right down, and my hook is still going strong!
Listen to your body. If you truly can’t crochet – DON’T CROCHET! I feel like I’m speaking sacrilege, considering the title of this blog. However, if you continue to crochet when your fingers and thumbs are killing you, you’re likely to cause further injury, in which case you might have to stop crocheting for months. Now that would be so wrong, so very wrong indeed!
Put your lotion in the fridge and use it while it’s cold! Massage it into your hands and let it soothe them. Hey, if you can afford it, treat yourself to regular manicures too. My manicures are reserved for special occasions; every time I wonder why I don’t go more often! Wowee!!! I’ve had some of the absolute best hand massages in those places!
Stretch your fingers…all the time! I have the funniest little dog. He’s stretches more than anyone I know, and you know what, he’s got a shake in his little tushy that no one can rival. My bet is on the fact he stretches so much. So if you want your fingers to be nice and limber with crochet hook in hand, stretching them often has to be on my list of advice!
Anyway, this has been a really fun post to write. I hope it’s been useful for you too. The advice I offer here is all tried and true. I do every one of these things myself. I’m not a doctor, and this is a far cry from medical advice. It’s just from one avid crocheter to another, in the hopes your hands never hurt too much to crochet!
That’s all for now,
Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
Until next time, I wish you every good thing!
M. J.

Photo credit:  Crochet – round, flora, GNU Free Documentation License
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Granny Style Basics


by M. J. Joachim
Our latest patterns on the website are solid and multi-color granny style hexagon motifs. Both patterns consist of three rounds. However, you can easily decrease or add rounds to your motif as required for the pattern or project you have in mind.
A few basic principles apply when making granny style motifs. Once you understand these, you can apply them to make numerous multi-sided granny style shapes and motifs.
Granny style is also known as traditional or classic American, so when you see a pattern titled traditional square or American square, chances are you’ll be seeing a pattern following basic granny style rules.
  • Most granny style begin with a short chain joined with a slip stitch to form a ring.
  • Corners for granny style are created by making {3 dc + chain 2 + 3 dc}. Beginning corners start with chain 3, which counts as the first dc in the round.
  • Once the corners are made, each round adds chain 1 spaces between them, subsequently making 3 double crochet stitches in the previous chain 1 space.
  • Sides are increased by adding chain 1 spaces between corners and groups of 3 double crochet stitches.
  • Rounds are joined with a slip stitch to the top chain of the 1st double crochet.
  • Single color granny style requires slip stitching over to the nearest corner, to begin new corner for round.
  • Multi-color granny style requires finishing off, then joining new color in a chain 2 corner space.

Granny style motifs make fabulous coaster sets. I have them all over the house, in various shapes and sizes. Whenever anyone needs a coaster, they simply grab a granny motif to set their glass down.
Anyone desiring a more finished look on their coasters can easily single crochet around the motif. You can also make a small granny style table runner or doily, to make a matching set for your tabletops and wood surfaces.
How would you rate crocheting granny style on a scale of 1 – 10? Is it one of your favorite’s because it’s quick and easy, or is it something you fall back on, to use up old yarn scraps?
Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
Until next time, I wish you every good thing.
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Crochet Fiber Arts


by M. J. Joachim
One of the things I love about crochet is that it can literally be used to create various types of artwork. Work is intense and often displays 3-D projects, glistening with intricate detail and worthy of wild acclaim.
Some of the pictures I found when searching for crocheted artwork include: sculptures of the human body, musical instruments and imagesfrom the sea.
Fiber art is a bit different from yarn bombing, however. Yarn bombing falls into the category of fiber art graffiti. What began in the Netherlands in 2004 as a fun way to use up leftover yarn, has become a worldwide phenomenon.
Which begs the questions…
What positively imaginative crochet project do you dream of making, and do you plan to make your dream come true?
Have you ever yarn bombed? If so, we want to hear about it.
If not, does yarn bombing intrigue you and would you ever do it, if given the chance?
Meanwhile, I’m up to my eyeballs preparing lots of new crochet patterns for the upcoming A – Z Challenge this spring. To date, I’ve finished 12 so far. I think you’ll be very happy with the theme I’ve chosen this year. I hope you’re participating too, so we can share the wonderful world of crochet with everyone!
Best to all!
Until next time, happy crocheting!
M. J.
Photo credit:  Fiets Wildbreien, Baykedevries, Creative Commons Attribution
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Monday, February 18, 2013

Easy Single Crochet Leaf Pattern 021813


by M. J. Joachim
Step 1:  Chain 2, single crochet in 2nd chain from hook
Step 2:  Chain 1, turn; make 2 single crochet in next single crochet
Step 3:  Chain 1, turn; make 2 single crochet in each sc; chain 1 turn
Step 4:  Make 2 single crochet in next sc and 1 single crochet in following sc (twice)
Step 5:  Single crochet decrease over next 2 stitches, followed by 1 single crochet in following stitch (twice); chain 1, turn
Step 6:  Single crochet in next stitch; single crochet decrease over next 2 stitches; single crochet decrease over next stitch and turning chain
Step 7:  Chain 1, turn; single crochet decrease over next 2 stitches; single crochet in last stitch
Step 8:  Chain 1, turn; single crochet in next stitch
Finish off. Weave in loose ends.
Until next time, happy crocheting!
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Friday, February 15, 2013

Sedge Stitch Variation 2 021513


by M. J. Joachim
The sedge stitch works up quickly and easily. I’ve created two separate variation tutorials for you today. Variation 1 is listed on our website in the margin and Variation 2 is shown right here in this blog post.
Because both sedge stitch variations use the same number of foundation chains, you can easily incorporate both stitches in the same design or pattern.
Sedge Stitch Variation 2 Tutorial
Foundation:  Make a multiple of 3 chain stitches (+3 more chain stitches)
Step 1:  Make 2 double crochet in the 3rd stitch from hook
Step 2:  Make 1 single crochet + 2 double crochet in the 3rd stitch from hook
[Repeat Step 2 across row, ending with 1 single crochet in last stitch]
Step 3:  Chain 1, turn; make 2 double crochet in 1st stitch
Step 4:  Make 1 single crochet + 2 double crochet in next single crochet
[Repeat Step 4 across row, ending with 1 single crochet in last stitch]
Repeat Steps 3 & 4 for pattern.
Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
I’m looking forward to seeing you again soon!
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

February's Doily - WIP Wednesday

by M. J. Joachim

I still have to weave in loose ends, steam and relax stitches, pin and shape doily, test and write up pattern to put on our site, but I believe it's fair to say, February's doily is pretty much a done deal.



Thank for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches. 
Until next time, I wish you every good thing!

M. J. 


©2013 All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

A – Zing through My Blogs Part 4


by M. J. Joachim
Today, I’ve been taking a journey called A – Zing through My Blogs. This is the virtual tour of all five of my blogs, entered in the A – Z Challenge 2013. As mentioned in Part 1 on Writing Tips, each one of my blogs is very different. That’s why I’ve designed this tour. Please feel free to join us, and find out (almost) everything I’m up to for the A – Z Challenge.
This is where my A – Z adventures began on April 1, 2012. That’s right! I found out the night of the start of the challenge and said to myself, “I can do that.” I’m happy to say, I was right.
A little less than a year ago, Lots of Crochet Stitches was a blog. Looking back, I must admit, it was a rather unorganized blog too…and perhaps a bit messy.
Then the rush (in a good way) of keeping up with the A – Z challenge started. My blog consisted mostly of crochet stitch tutorials, until I was forced to be extra creative, that is.
Xeranthemum has to be my favorite. Looked up words for X, found a botanical name for a flower and voila! I created and wrote a tutorial for it. Those flowers have made their way to magnets on my fridge and become accents for packages and such throughout the year.
By summer 2012, I was completely reorganizing my blog. By fall 2012, I’d built and launched a website! This, all because on a whim, I entered the A – Z Challenge 2012! Thank you, Lee and all you wonderful hosts of the A – Z Challenge!
Amidst all this, my creative writing needed a release. Huge flash fiction fan here - I also positively love to write the stuff! My FlashTyme blog was born, the last stop in our virtual tour called A – Zing through My Blogs – Check out Part 5 here, to see what strange tales get woven through my mind and expressed in as few words as possible. 
Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches,
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Sunday, February 10, 2013

Button End Keychain 021013


by M. J. Joachim

Many of us have old buttons stored away in case we need them someday. This crochet project takes an old button and turns it into the end of a keychain.
You Will Need
A small amount of size 10 doily thread – you’ll be working with 2 strands together. They can be the same or different colors, according to personal preference.
Size 1/2.75 mm steel crochet hook
1 Button
1 Yarn needle
1 Key ring
Step 1:  Thread a yarn needle with 2 strands of doily thread that matches your button.


Step 2: Thread needle, keeping spools of thread attached at other end, and sew through back of button a few times to secure. Leave a long tail. Remove needle when finished.


Step 3:  Join your crochet hook at button end, with thread attached to spool. Chain around long tail, making chain approximately 2 – 3 inches long.



Step 4:  Take your key ring and slip stitch over it, to join it to your chain. Chain 1; single crochet in ring twice.



Step 5:  Turn, single crochet in each chain, back to the end of your button.


Finish off. Weave in loose ends.
This project works up so quickly, that you have time to make a few for Valentine’s Day this week. Use heart buttons with red, white and pink threads, and surprise your favorite Valentine with a unique and festive keychain!
That’s all for now, kind followers.
Until next time, I wish you every good thing.
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Saturday, February 9, 2013

Exploring the Process of Crochet Design


by M. J. Joachim
I wanted to take some time today to discuss the process of crochet design. The other day, I posted a new circle in hexagon design here on the blog, followed by a floral circular motif posted on our website.



Both of these patterns were the result of an initial design process.
In my mind, I wanted to make a multi-sided shape. Through trial and error, I managed to come up with a basic design. This was only the rough draft, however.
Rough Draft
As I looked closely at my stitches, I visually picked them apart, noticing everything that could possibly be wrong with what I was trying to make. Then I stepped back, played some cards with the family, and let my thoughts settle until I could sort them all out.
Upon close scrutiny of my design, two things stood out very boldly to me:
I had a hexagon.
Those outer stitches were way too tightly woven.
The hexagon was actually quite nice, which is why I came up with the post to go with it. But I still wanted to make my original design.
The process of tearing out and remaking stitches had to begin. Upon inspecting and fiddling with my design, I realized I could increase stitches in certain areas, while leaving the same amount in others, which would ultimately create a similar effect, while loosening up my pattern.
Take a close look at both pictures. Study them to see how adding stitches loosens up the design, and makes the pattern more delicate and pretty.
Now it’s your turn. Follow these steps and make a motif.
Step 1:  Start with the center – make a small chain, form a loop or center, by crocheting in the 1st chain. Use your basic stitch count – 1 for sc, 2 for hdc, 3 for dc etc. to begin each round. Join rounds with slip stitches. Apply all standard rules of crochet to your work.
Step 2:   Build outward, increasing your motif in size, by adding stitches around it. As your motif gets bigger, add more stitches in strategic places, to naturally increase its size. Consider if you need or want to add corners, and if so, add extra stitches where you need them to be – 3 stitches per corner is a good rule of thumb. However, you can also do something like this: {stitch, stitch, chain(s), stitch, stitch}, similar to how we make corners in granny squares.
Step 3:  Once you have a rough draft, study it. See how you can make improvements to it. Notice what other things might readily be apparent in your design.
Step 4:  Implement your observations, in a separate final copy of your design. Fiddle with any section of your pattern that you simply don’t like. Make the obvious changes first. If your stitches on the rough draft are too tight, loosen them up by adding more stitches. If they are gathering too much (creating ruffles you don’t like), decrease the amount of stitches you have.
It takes time to design nice crochet projects, but it is more than worth it. You will master the art of crochet, by learning through trial and error. Practice makes perfect. Each time you take a rough draft design and turn it into a final project you can be proud of, you have the opportunity to learn many things from the process.
I hope you will take this particular post to heart and experiment with design work and technique. It’s a lot of fun to come up with original creations, using a variety of stitches. It’s also exciting when, through the process, you come up with a few things you didn’t expect – like circle in hexagon motifs.
The best is yet to come from all this. I’m working with both projects mentioned here today, to make yet another project to share with all of you. It wasn’t planned, but through the design process, it soon became apparent that that’s what I should do.
Thank you for following Lots of Crochet Stitches.
Until next time, I wish you every good thing.
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Gratitude and Blog Hops – A Perfect WIP Day!


by M. J. Joachim

First, I’d like to send out a GREAT BIG THANK YOU to Stephen Tremp, for featuring my Basic Stitch Blog Hop in the margin on his blog! I know we’re all a bunch of crocheters and crafters out here, but I’ve got to tell you, the art of blogging matters. 
Learning to craft intriguing and well-received blog posts is a must, if you want to get a following – that and following other bloggers. Here’s your chance to meet all sorts of new people in the blogosphere, because Stephen’s site shares more blog hops than you’d ever be able to join!
Onto WIP Wednesday now…
I truly thought I would have this project finished already, and I sure hope I finish it soon. It’s one of those works I started, thinking it would be a quick project – maybe even a weekender. I suppose it could be, if I had time to sit for hours crocheting and doing nothing else all day. I’m excited to finish it – won’t tell you what it is, but will post it on our website when it’s ready. The design is planned, so all I need to do is finish crocheting it.


Next up, our February Blog Hops…
I’m working on both projects and very excited to list them upon completion. However, I know some of you don’t have time to create two new projects for February. If you’d like to link one of your past projects that fits the blog hops, that’s fine! Please feel free to do so. Search your archives and let’s get this party started!
Extra incentive…I will be posting all links in their respective categories, and sending visitors your way if you play along! Imagine the doilies you could sell, or the basic stitch purses, jewelry, scarves, hats, kitchen towels etc. Yes, you can post a link to your Etsy, Ravelry or other store front page, provided it is of the specific project for the blog hop, that is. I’m happy to help you promote your work. It’s the blogosphere and we need to work together!
I’m still working on another project, which I hope to post about soon. As always, thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
Best to all,
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Circle in Hexagon 020513


by M. J. Joachim
This pattern uses two colors, one for a button type center, the other to make a circle within a hexagon. You can probably get very creative with your colors and make something truly amazing when working up this motif.
Uses 2 colors: Color A & Color B
Step 1:  Chain 2, slip stitch in 2nd chain from hook; chain 3 (counts as 1st dc); make one more double crochet in same place, chain 1
Step 2:  Make 2 dc + chain 1 (5 more times); join with slip stitch to top chain of 1st dc
Step 3:  Slip stitch in next double crochet and into 1st chain 1 space; chain 1, single crochet in same place
Step 4:  Chain 3, single crochet in next chain 1 space
[Repeat Step 4 around, ending with chain 3 and a slip stitch to 1st single crochet in round.]
Finish off Color A.
Step 5:  Join Color B to any chain 3 loop; chain 3 (counts as 1st dc); make 2 more dc in same place; make 1 pineapple stitch in same place, followed by 3 dc in same place
Step 6:  Make {3 dc, 1 pineapple stitch, 3 dc} in each chain 3 space around. Join with a slip stitch to top chain of 1st double crochet
Step 7:  Chain 1, single crochet in same place; single crochet in each stitch around, ending with a slip stitch to 1st single crochet in round
Step 8:  Chain 1, single crochet in same place
Step 9:  Chain 9, single crochet in 7th stitch from hook
[Repeat Step 9 around, ending with chain 7 and a slip stitch to 1st single crochet in round.]
Step 10:  Slip stitch in each of the next 5 chain stitches; chain 1, make {1 sc, 1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, 1 dc, 1hdc, 1 sc} in same place
Step 11:  Chain 5, make stitch sequence in Step 10 in next chain loop
[Repeat Step 11 around, ending with chain 5 and joining with a slip stitch to 1st single crochet in round.]
Finish off. Weave in loose ends.
That’s all for now, kind followers,
Until next time, happy crocheting,
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Monday, February 4, 2013

Arrow Crochet Stitch Pattern


by M. J. Joachim
This is a fun pattern to make and will be perfect for all sorts of projects. My first thought is of a cardigan sweater. However, the more I think about it, this might be a fabulous stitch for an afghan too.
A word of caution…
Do your absolute best to keep your dtr’s even and similar in size. This pattern can quickly end up messy and covered in loose threads, if you don’t.
Foundation row:  Make a multiple of 4 chain stitches (+1 more chain)
Step 1:  Single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each chain across
Step 2:  Chain 1, turn; single crochet in next stitch and in each stitch across row
Step 3:  Chain 3 (counts as 1st dc), double crochet in next stitch
Step 4:  Make 1 double triple (dtr) in 4th stitch from hook
Step 5:  Work behind dtr just made. Make 1 double crochet in each of the 3 stitches skipped


[Repeat Steps 4 and 5 across row, ending with 1 dc in last stitch and 1 dc in turning chain]


Step 6:  Chain 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc in next stitch
Step 7:  Make 1 double triple in next dtr
Step 8:  Work in front of dtr just made. Make 1 double crochet in each of the 3 stitches skipped


[Repeat Steps 7 and 8 across row, ending with 1 dc in last dc and 1 dc in top of turning chain]


Step 9:  Chain 1, turn; single crochet in next stitch and in each stitch across row, and in top of turning chain at end of row.
Repeat Steps 2 – 9 for pattern.
Thank you for visiting Lots of Crochet Stitches.
Until next time, happy crocheting!
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Sunday, February 3, 2013

February 2013 Doily Blog Hop



The rules are simple.
If you make a February 2013 doily and you have a link to share it, you’re invited to submit your link right here, to get as many page views on it as possible.
Naturally, you’re encouraged to share this blog hop with your friends, because everyone wants to admire as many February 2013 doilies as possible. I’m still thinking about how I’ll design and craft my Feb doily this month, but you can bet I’ll be posting a link before the month is over.
Now I’m not spoiling any fun, by letting us all post pics during my link parties. I like the thrill of the surprise, when we enter a new page and site. Found some great ones yesterday, thanks to my friend, Weaver Birdie over at I Love Crochet. Scroll on down her page and check out #3! Signed up to follow that blog in record time, I tell ya!
Oh, and don’t forget to sign up for the Basic Stitch Crochet Blog Hop I posted on February 1. Submit your blog link, then come back and submit your basic stitch project link, after you’ve finished making it, of course.
Here’s the link list for our February 2013 Doily Blog Hop. Looking forward to seeing what everyone comes up with…
Happy Sunday, dear people!

Go 9ers!

And happy crocheting, one and all!
M. J.
©2013 All Rights Reserved

Saturday, February 2, 2013

My Blog is a Premio Cutie Pie!



“I’m cute! I’m cute!” Seems every time I hear the word cute, I can’t help but think of Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer!
“What could she possibly be talking about,” you may be asking yourselves right about now.
Well, it just so happens that I’ve been nominated by I Love Handmade for the Premio Cutie Pie award! Thank you, Weaver Birdie, for giving me this distinct and kind award!
My understanding is that I am to nominate 5 other fabulous bloggers with this delightful and cheery award. Here goes…
Poetic Parfait by Christy B.
Gone Gardening by Sherri Ellis
Crochetkari by Sangeetha
Go Crochet by Ellen Gormley
All of these bloggers work hard to make their blogs top-notch. I visit them regularly, and hope you will have as much fun visiting them as I do.
In case you missed it, I made a new bookmark today and posted it on our website. The pattern is listed in the margin (subject to move its way off the list, as I add more tutorials to the website), and under Crochet Crafts & Projects up above.
This has been a wonderful Saturday. My husband came home last night, after a week-long business trip. I missed him so. Needless to say, computer time has been hit and miss today, depending on when he needed to sleep from the jetlag.
Wishing you every good thing until next time,
M. J.

Friday, February 1, 2013

Basic Stitch Crochet Blog Hop



You are cordially invited to attend the Basic Stitch Crochet Blog Hop and join the party, taking place for the entire month of February. I’m the host, so if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask. Mind you, I’m new at this (never hosted a blog hop before). Please be patient with me, while I attend to my learning curves. Thanks!
Rules
  • Blog hop runs February 1 – 28, 2013.
  • Create a crochet project using only basic stitches. It can be as simple as a motif, and as complicated as an entire afghan. You can design it yourself or follow a pattern. The only catch is that it must be made entirely of basic crochet stitches – no fancy ones allowed.
  • Also, you must make a real motif or project – not a practice swatch.
  • Share the love! Follow and link to this blog, so more avid crocheters and yarn enthusiasts can join the fun!
  • Sign up now and link your crochet blog to the list below. Then, when your project is complete, come back to share the individual post showcasing your work.
  • Please keep in mind, this is a blog hop. You are encouraged to visit and comment on as many links posted by participants as possible, throughout the month of February.

That’s all there is to it. I do hope you’ll join us!

M. J.
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